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Bibliography

Total entries: 72.


introduction

This has become a bibliography and comment section, and is most useful when looked at in conjunction with the reading list of books I intend to get to reading at some point. I think that it's useful to show people may current background and state of thought, and this is probably the easiest way of doing so. I don't pretend to have produced a useful critical outline of each resource: that's not what this section is about. The intention is to allow me to record my thoughts about resources, and only, really, in terms which I think are likely to be relevant to my field of study - trust relationships in the distributed peer-to-peer (p2p) world. Neither do I pretend to a consistency of classification - the trust section, in particular, might be better expressed as a subsection of the sociology section. I feel it's useful to separate out certain aspects, however, and expect to continue doing so. I'm also aware that a number of anthropologists and animal psychologists might be unhappy with my lumping of their disciplines together, but it works for my purposes, and I have no plans to change it in the near term.

I've listed articles within books separately, rather than under a general heading, as this is how I'm likely to reference them. I'm aware that this section has got rather long (partly due to this decision), and I've given some thoughts about how to remedy this, but have come to the conclusion that other than splitting it into sections (which I've done), it's not actually worth separating out things much more. I suspect that this page will act as a better resource for people to scan over my thoughts - maybe responding to them (mike@hingston.demon.co.uk) - if the "complete set" is there for all to see. At some point, I may have to split out the sections, but I suspect that the sociology section is going to remain the largest, so it's probably not worth it. Comments are welcome.

Harvard reference style (or something resembling it) is used throughout.


anthropology and animal psychology


computing


fiction


mathematics


p2p


reputation


security


sociology


trust


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Mike Bursell - mike@p2ptrust.org

Last modified: Sun Apr 13 17:26:49 BST 2003